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How do we choose a text?

Choosing a text can be as difficult as choosing a design. Mickie offers 8 different text choices ranging from the Traditional to the Modern. You should read through all of the texts and choose the one that best reflects your own beliefs and worldview. It would be wise to get your rabbi’s or officiant’s approval before ordering your ketubah (some rabbis might desire a particular text).

Please note, the texts of different ketubot come in different sizes and shapes. We usually show only one shape of our texts on the website so that you can read the actual text. Any traditional quote that appears on the text shown, might or might NOT appear on your actual ketubah. Even if you see a particular quote on the text that you choose, it might not appear on your actual ketubah. If you would like to know if a specific quote appears, please call us to confirm.

The Traditional Aramaic (Orthodox) text is a prenuptial agreement between the groom and the bride wherein the husband undertakes to honor, support and maintain his wife. In the document he states that she will receive a certain sum of money in the event of divorce or of his death. (In Israel today, the specific sum is sometimes even tied to the dollar because of its greater stability than the Israeli Shekel.) It is a very formal contract written in Aramaic over 2000 years ago and originally was a valuable document that protected the bride. There is no English on this text. Click here to read a Translation of the Orthodox Text.

The Traditional Aramaic with Contemporary English (Orthodox) text is the same Aramaic document as above. The English portion is NOT a translation of the Aramaic, but rather a contemporary text written by Mickie & Eran. Click here to read a Translation of the Orthodox Text.

The Lieberman Clause with Contemporary English (Conservative) text is almost the same text as the Traditional Aramaic. An added clause developed by Rabbi Lieberman is inserted into the text creating an arbitration agreement in the case of a civil divorce. Either spouse can then appear before the Bet Din (rabbinic court) to request a “Get” (a Jewish divorce document). According to Jewish law, without this document, a woman is still legally married to her husband. If she wants to remarry and she doesn’t have a “Get”, any children that she would have with the second husband would be considered illegitimate. Conservative Rabbis often prefer the Lieberman Clause text to protect the woman in the unlikely event that a man refuses to grant her a “Get”, so please check with your rabbi first. Orthodox Rabbis do not accept the Lieberman Clause, so in fact it only relates to the Conservative Bet Din. The English portion is NOT a translation of the Aramaic, but rather a contemporary text written by Mickie & Eran. Click here to read a Translation of the Conservative Text.

The Egalitarian Hebrew and English (Reform) text is suitable for reform weddings. Mickie and Eran wrote the English text and carefully translated it into modern, poetic Hebrew. It was modeled on the traditional text, yet reflects a more egalitarian view of Judaism and the equal roles of a husband and wife in our contemporary Jewish society.

The Modern English with Hebrew heading (Interfaith) text, was specifically written for couples of different heritages, although it has been used by Jewish couples who were raised in different traditions. It has a short Hebrew heading (a translation of the first English paragraph) where the bride and groom’s personal information is inscribed. This text was written by Mickie & Eran.

The Anniversary with Hebrew heading text is designed for couples celebrating an anniversary from 2 years to 70 or more years. It records the bride and groom’s original wedding and does not need to be signed. Since the tradition of using an illuminated ketubah has been re-introduced into the ceremony only 10 to 15 years ago, many couples who have been married for more than 10 years never had a beautiful ketubah. They are now either deciding to purchase a ketubah for themselves in order to renew their vows, or they can receive one as a gift (often from their children). This text was written by Mickie & Eran.

The Alternative Egalitarian (Reform) text is suitable for reform, as well as humanist and interfaith weddings. The Hebrew is a direct translation of the English. The signature lines have been left off because we fill in this portion of the ketubah when we personalize it according to the specifications of the couple. Some couples opt for the standard signature lines (2 Witnesses, Bride, Groom, and Rabbi), but some people want the word “beloved” instead of bride and groom, or the word “Officiant” or “Cantor” instead of Rabbi. If not specified, we will enter lines for 2 Witnesses, Bride, Groom and Officiant. This text was written by Mickie & Eran.

The Commitment Vows (Same Sex) text is the only ketubah specifically written with same sex couples in mind. The Hebrew is a direct translation of the English. The signature lines have been left off because we fill in this portion of the ketubah when we personalize it according to the specifications of the couple. We normally add signature lines for 2 Witnesses, 2 Beloveds and 1 Officiant, but you can ask for your own specific signature lines. This text was written by Mickie & Eran in 1995 and was the first pre-printed, same sex text to be offered.

The Humanist English only text was written for couples who prefer not to have any Hebrew on the ketubah. It is suitable for humanist or secular ceremonies, as well as for interfaith couples. This text was written by Mickie & Eran.

If you are a couple that would like to write your own text, Mickie can hand-calligraph any original text onto the ketubah of your choice. We would be happy to discuss this option. You can call us at 1-800-538-8268 at your convenience.

All of the texts were carefully composed to meet the different needs of couples expressing the many various forms of Judaism today. Please note that all of our texts are copyrighted and registered with the Library of Congress and may not be reproduced without our express written permission.