Ketubot by Text

Click on the Ketubah Text of your choice to view all available ketubot by text. If you click on the highlighted name in the description, it will open a window to read the actual text. To read all of the texts at once, go to Read Ketubah Texts. Please note that a quote shown for a specific text, might not be available on your specific ketubah. Please call and we will be happy to tell you which quote appears on your choice.

A - Traditional Aramaic (Orthodox)

The Traditional Aramaic (Orthodox) text is a prenuptial agreement between the groom and the bride wherein the husband undertakes to honor, support and maintain his wife. In the document he states that she will receive a certain sum of money in the event of divorce or of his death. (In Israel today, the specific sum is sometimes even tied to the dollar because of its greater stability than the Israeli Shekel.) It is a very formal contract written in Aramaic over 2000 years ago and originally was a valuable document that protected the bride. There is no English on this text.

B - Traditional Aramaic with Contemporary English (Orthodox)

The Traditional Aramaic with Contemporary English (Orthodox) text is the same Aramaic document as above. The English portion is NOT a translation of the Aramaic, but rather a contemporary text written by Mickie & Eran. Not all ketubot have witness lines pre-printed in English.

C - Lieberman with Contemporary English (Conservative)

The Lieberman Clause with Contemporary English (Conservative) text is almost the same text as the Traditional Aramaic. A new clause is added essentially stating that in the case of a civil divorce, either the husband or wife can appear before the Bet Din (rabbinic court) to request a "Get" (a Jewish divorce document). According to Jewish law, without this document, a woman is still legally married to her husband. If she wants to remarry and she doesn't have a "Get", any children that she would have with the second husband would be considered illegitimate. Conservative Rabbis often prefer the Lieberman Clause text to protect the woman in the unlikely event that a man refuses to grant her a "Get", so please check with your rabbi first. Orthodox Rabbis do not accept the Lieberman Clause, so in fact it only relates to a Conservative Bet Din. The English portion is NOT a translation of the Aramaic, but rather a contemporary text written by Mickie & Eran.

D - Egalitarian Hebrew and English (Reform)

The Egalitarian Hebrew and English (Reform) text is suitable for reform weddings. Mickie and Eran wrote the English text and carefully translated it into modern, poetic Hebrew. It was modeled on the traditional text, yet reflects a more egalitarian view of Judaism and the equal roles of a husband and wife in our contemporary Jewish society.

E - Modern English with Hebrew Heading (Interfaith)

The Modern English with Hebrew heading (Interfaith) text, was specifically written for couples of different heritages, although it has been used by Jewish couples who were raised in different traditions. It has a short Hebrew heading (a translation of the first English paragraph) where the bride and groom's personal information is inscribed. This text was written by Mickie & Eran.

F - Anniversary with Hebrew heading

The Anniversary with Hebrew heading text is designed for couples celebrating an anniversary from 2 years to 70 or more years. It records the bride and groom's original wedding and does not need to be signed. Since the tradition of using an illuminated ketubah has been re-introduced into the ceremony only 10 to 15 years ago, many couples who have been married for more than 10 years never had a beautiful ketubah. They are now either deciding to purchase a ketubah for themselves in order to renew their vows, or they can receive one as a gift (often from their children). This text was written by Mickie & Eran.

G - Alternative Egalitarian (Reform)

The Alternative Egalitarian (Reform) text is suitable for reform, humanist, and interfaith weddings, but it is also the only ketubah specifically written with same sex couples in mind. The Hebrew is a direct translation of the English. The signature lines have been left off because we fill in this portion of the ketubah when we personalize it according to the specifications of the couple. Some couples opt for the standard signature lines (2 Witnesses, Bride, Groom, and Rabbi), but some people want the word "beloved" instead of bride and groom, or the word "Officiant" or "Cantor" instead of Rabbi. If not specified, we will enter lines for 2 Witnesses, Bride, Groom and Officiant. This text was written by Mickie & Eran.

G1- Commitment Vows (Same Sex)

The Commitment Vows (Same Sex) text is the only ketubah specifically written with same sex couples in mind. The Hebrew is a direct translation of the English. The signature lines have been left off because we fill in this portion of the ketubah when we personalize it according to the specifications of the couple. We normally add signature lines for 2 Witnesses, 2 Beloveds and 1 Officiant, but you can ask for your own specific signature lines. This text was written by Mickie & Eran in 1995 to fill a need in the market at a time when very few artists were offering same sex texts.

H - Blank for hand calligraphed original texts

All of Mickie's ketubot are available blank (except for the Feather Crescent Ketubah) so that we can individually calligraph your own custom text into the design of your choice. You will need to type the English portion of your text exactly as you wish it to appear on the ketubah. If you want Hebrew on your custom text, you will have to have the Hebrew portion translated and either typed in Hebrew, or written out very neatly by hand.
Please allow 4 to 6 weeks to complete. The cost of custom texts is $1.25 per word. Since custom texts are so much work, we do have rush charges - within 3 weeks, add 20% & within 10 days, add 40%. For more information regarding custom texts, please call 1-800-KETUBOT (1-800-538-8268).

I - Humanist English only

The Humanist English only text was written for couples who prefer not to have any Hebrew on the ketubah. It is suitable for humanist or secular ceremonies, as well as for interfaith couples. This text was written by Mickie & Eran